Choosing the right time

When is the right time to move a patient into palliative or hospice care? It’s a question that both family and medical practitioners wrestle with, and one that’s been examined in a recent journal article. Unfortunately, the study found that in a great many cases referrals for terminal cancer patients are being made too late. Some oncologists are only referring terminal patients to hospice care after their treatments are complete—which as the article explains may be just weeks or even days before they pass.

So why am I concerned about this finding? Well, the end result of delaying a referral is that the patients don’t really have the opportunity to benefit from the care and may undergo undue physical and emotional suffering as a result.

The reason for this problem is, I think, two-fold. A large part of this stems from the overall lack of understanding from those outside the palliative realm about the exact purpose guiding the services we provide. Palliative care is about giving patients the highest possible quality of life we can during their final days, weeks, or months. People facing a terminal diagnosis often need that kind of support very early on, even if they’re still getting chemotherapy or another type of treatment.

It also speaks to the compartmentalization of modern health care delivery. Far too often one practitioner is unaware of what another is doing, or is unaware of what their relationship is to those services. One of my main goals as both a practitioner and an instructor is to ensure that people understand that palliative care is done best when it’s done in a complementary fashion, recognizing that at this difficult time in a person’s life we have to treat the mind, body and spirit.

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